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Physiobot® does not offer medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Physiobot is not a replacement for a physical therapist or doctor. Please consult with your physical therapist or doctor if you have any questions about your symptoms and/or prior to initiating a new exercise program.

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Physiobot delivers instant knee pain analysis for the following conditions

Meniscus Irritation

The meniscus is a ring of cartilage located inside of your knee joint. Its main job is to help absorb shock, however, the meniscus can also provide some stability to the knee. Irritation can occur thru knee trauma, or simply "wear and tear" over time.

Patellar Glide Dysfunction

The patella is the kneecap. It normally glides smoothly in a "C" shaped pattern when bending the knee. Dysfunctions of patellar glide can lead to localized inflammation and pain, and in more extreme circumstances - patellar dislocation.

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IT Band Pain

The iliotibial (IT) band is a thick band of tissue running from the outer hip down to below the outer knee. When tight, it can put pressure on structures of the outer knee, causing friction and pain. It's most common in cyclists and runners.

Osteoarthritis

Knee osteoarthritis is the wearing down of the thin cartilage covering the ends of the knee bones or underneath the kneecap. Often a natural part of the aging process, osteoarthritis tends to effect people over 50 years of age.

Collateral Ligament Injury

The collateral ligaments provide side-to-side static stability to the knee. There are two such ligaments, the Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) and Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL.) Injury most commonly occurs from inner or outer blows to the knee, but a fall/twisting of the knee can also effect these structures. 

Bursitis/Cysts

A bursa is a fluid-filled sac which acts to reduce friction between structures in the body, most commonly between tendons and bones. Irritation commonly occurs due to muscle tightness or overuse.

Tendon Dysfunctions

Tendonitis in the knee is caused by inflammation to the tendon connecting muscle to bone. It is commonly found in athletes who perform frequent jumping or kicking, but can effect non-athletes as well.  

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Cruciate Ligament Injuries

You have two cruciate ligaments, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) and the Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL.) Together they control the back and forth knee motion. ACL injury is by far the most common and typically found in athletes. 

Meniscus Tears

The meniscus is a ring of cartilage located inside of your knee joint. Its main job is to help absorb shock, however, the meniscus can also provide some stability to the knee. Acute trauma such as forceful twisting of the knee or falls are common mechanism for tears.

Bone Injury

Bone injuries occur primarily from blunt force trauma (i.e. falling on the knee). The three structures most commonly involved in the knee are the lower leg bone (tibia), the thigh bone (femur) and the patellar (kneecap.)